Juliette Gordon Low

Picture of Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low

Who: Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of Girl Scouts of America; philanthropist

Why She Dazzles: Juliette met Sir Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of the Boy Scouts, who inspired her to spread the scouting movement for men and women in the United States. She formed the first female troop with a diverse group of girls from different cultures, ethnicities, and incomes in her hometown of Savannah, Georgia. Nicknamed “Daisy,” history proved that Daisy organized one of the most influential educational organizations for young women in the world.

Why You Need to Know Her Today: ‘Tis the season for Girl Scout cookies. You are likely eating a Girl Scout cookie right now. Or, at least you want to eat that Thin Mint or Samoa. Yes, we can all thank the Girl Scouts for those delicious treats, but they offer so much more than just sweets. Juliette believed in helping girls develop and grow their leadership skills; she wanted to strengthen their self-esteem. She used her own money and social connections to build awareness for the organization because she wanted a gathering place for women to support each other and build each other up. Ladies supporting ladies—an essential to our success then and now.

What She Would Say—Because She Wrote It Then: “Badges mean nothing in themselves, but they mark a certain achievement and they are a link between the rich and the poor. For when one girl sees a badge on a sister Scout’s arm, if that girl has won the same badge, it at once awakens an interest and sympathy between them.”

Picture of a jeweled palm leaf brooch by Banana Republic
Some of the early badges were about flying, typing, telegraph skills and farming.

 

What She Would Wear to a Troop Meeting Tonight: A pin to wear on her jacket lapel. Juliette was a Georgia debutante with extraordinary social connections in the U.S. and in England, where she spent several years living with her husband. She hosted parties and events where she welcomed the Prince of Wales and authors like Rudyard Kipling. Despite her wealthy upbringing, she did charitable work and she later inspired her Girl Scouts to participate in philanthropic activities.

Picture of Scout Pop Art Greeting Card on Cafe Press
Juliette believed that together, women can change the world.

 

What She Would Send to Her Friend: “Make new friends, but keep the old. One is silver and one is gold. A circle is round, it has no end. That’s how long, I want to be your friend.” These lyrics are part of a traditional Girl Scout song that has carried for decades. Juliette founded the girl-led program where friendship was a central theme. “Truly, ours is a circle of friendships, united by our ideals,” she said.

Picture of Juliette Gordon Low birthplace in Savannah, Georgia
The Girl Scouts purchased Juliette’s birthplace in 1953 to save the house from demolition. They led a major fundraising effort to support the restoration that celebrates Juliette’s belief in the potential of every girl.

 

Where She Would Instagram: Savannah. Juliette gathered her first group of Girl Scouts in her hometown, beginning a movement that encouraged women to be curious and to believe they can do anything, and to help those in need while working together to improve their world. The Juliette Gordon Low birthplace, now a historic site owned by the Girl Scouts of the USA, was also where she made her famous phone call that kicked off the beginning of her group in 1912, when she said, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start tonight!”

Tweet This: Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low organized the first group of @GirlScouts on March 12, 1912, because she wanted to give girls the opportunity to get involved and participate in their community #anewlady

 

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